Posts Tagged ‘chaff’

Does Religion Have It Backwards?

September 26, 2008

When people mindlessly delegate their spiritual belief system to the pages of an old book (or the words of a religious leader) they insult the creator. Why? Because if God created us in his own image (with intelligence, curiosity, reason, and capacity for logic), then he himself must possess these traits. Furthermore, it follows that he must value them as well.

How disappointing it must be to the creator when someone pushes these wonderful gifts aside to blindly follow the written or oral words of mere mortals, disregarding the tools that God himself provided to examine the world and discern the truth.

Here is a thought to ponder. Religious people generally think that accepting their creed differentiates them from others, those they call unbelievers, infidels, pagans, heretics and the like. I agree! Unfortunately, I think they have it backwards.

Who is the wheat and who the chaff? Perhaps God created religion to find out who among us would be willing to shirk the moral obligation to personally seek him. Perhaps God wanted to see who would have the courage to reject religion and question the status quo (much the same way Jesus was reported to have done when he refuted the Pharisees). It is possible, even likely, that God gave us the gifts of intelligence, curiosity, reason, and the capacity for logic so that each of us would find genuine faith and not accept the pale, man-made imitation of faith that we call religion.

One can choose to blindly be lead by others. As for me, I choose to use my God-given gifts to question what has been handed to me by others before I swallow it whole out of fear or laziness or lack of confidence in my own divinity.

If there is a day of judgment and I stand before God to account for my life, at least I will be able to look him in the eye and say, “I may have been right, I may have been wrong, but at least I didn’t take the easy way out. If nothing else, I tried to find the real you.”

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Does Religion have it Backwards?

December 9, 2007

In Religions: Godly Garbages, sulochanosho wrote:

The whole world may glorify and sanctify the so called holy books of religions and sermons. But that is just an act not less than that of a suicide venture and an explicit insult to the life force.

I couldn’t agree more, especially the part about people glorifying the holy books of religion. When people blindly delegate their spiritual belief system to the pages of an old book (or the words of religious leaders) they insult the creator. Why? Because if God created us in his own image (with intelligence, curiosity, reason, and capacity for logic), then he himself must possess these traits. Furthermore, it follows that he must value them as well.

How disappointing it must be to the creator when someone pushes these wonderful gifts aside to blindly follow the written or oral words of mere mortals, disregarding the tools that God himself provided to examine the world and discern the truth.

Here is a thought to ponder. Some people believe that their religion separates them from others, that they are “saved” and those they call unbelievers, infidels, pagans, and heretics are lost. In Biblical times, farmers used to “winnow” their harvested wheat by crushing the dry husk (chaff) off the grain and allowing it to blow away, lost in the wind. The wheat was then saved. Christians use that ancient practice as a metaphor when they refer to God separating the chaff (unbelievers) from the wheat (themselves). I agree! Unfortunately, I think they have it backwards. What if the religious among us are actually the chaff?

Perhaps God created religion to find out who among us would be willing to shirk the moral obligation to diligently seek him personally. Perhaps God wanted to see who would have the courage to reject religion and question the status quo (much the same way Jesus was reported to have done when he refuted the Pharisees). It is possible, even likely, that God gave us the gifts of intelligence, curiosity, reason, and the capacity for logic so that each of us would be able to find genuine faith and not have to accept the pale, man-made imitation of faith that we call religion.

You can choose to blindly be lead by religion. Or, you can choose to use your God-given gifts to question what has been handed to you by religion before swallowing it whole out of fear or laziness or lack of confidence in your own divinity. By testing the tenets of religion you can determine what is good and what is pure and what is true. You can transmute dogma into faith! If there is a day of judgment and I stand before God to account for my life, I want to be able to look him in the eye and say, “I may have been right, I may have been wrong, but at least I didn’t take the easy way out. If nothing else, I tried to find the real you.”